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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)
? >> a storm relief event. >> if you have canned goods, bring them along. >> you need fema and need support. >> fema is about to run out of money. how do you deal with something like that. >> take something from the federal government and send it back to the states. >> you need fema and need support. >> if you can go even further and send it back to the private sector, that's even better. >> mitt romney can't show up on the east coast right now. he has to stay away. >> the president has been all over this. >> listen to your state and local officials. >> he deserves great credit. >> this storm is not yet over. >> the october surprise is here. >>> we begin tonight with the devastation from the massive storm called sandy. the death toll continues to rise. within the hour, it has gone from 43 deaths to 50. as a result of the storm. at least 23 of those deaths are in new york state. 18 here in new york city, alone. president obama has declared disasters in 11 states as well as washington, d.c. since sunday, the worst of the damage is in new jersey and new york. the president is scheduled to surv
that he would not answer was about fema. take a listen. >> governor, what should fema's role be? governor, would you eliminate fema if you were president? >> well, it's either 11 or 14 times, depending on whose count you believe. the campaign released a statement saying that romney would not abolish fema but, quote, governor romney believes that states should be in charge of emergency management in responding to storms and other natural disasters in their jurisdiction. that's from his spokesman, ryan williams. is this a problem for him, susan? >> well, i think it becomes an issue for him because of what he said in that primary debate that john king moderated where he was asked specifically about fema. he said anything that the federal government does that can be transferred to the states are better yet to the private sector. that's the right direction. so it leaves open the question of exactly what role he sees for fema. fema has been a controversial agency such as their delivery of services after katrina. however it's pretty popular when it comes in and helps and picks up the costs in th
companies will be embedding a representative with fema in order to better coordinate the response. soledad? >> power outages a big problem here. dan lothian, thanks. john berman's got a look at some of the other stories making news today. >>> police in virginia are looking for the source of three homemade bombs. investigators want to know who set off explosives outside two stafford county homes early tuesday morning. the two incidents have been linked to a third explosion tuesday inside a house in fredricksburg. no injuries were reported. >>> a guilty plea in arizona from a mexican man accused in the 2010 murder of u.s. border patrol agent brian perry. manuel osorio air ranous could be facing life in prison. the 36-year-old man said he got into a gun battle while he and four other armed men were looking for drug traffickers to rob. >>> another california surfer attacked by a shark. the 25-year-old is fighting for his life after he was bitten in his chest and abdomen yesterday. a depp puttpy in eureka saying one of the wounds is a 14 inch gash. other surfers helped pull him out of the water
the storm even hit so they were able to get here relatively quick. the national guard was here. fema was here. they were all working with the local authorities and were able to do it pretty smoothly. they've stopped search and rescue efforts for tonight and say they've gotten all of the elderly and handicapped people out of the area. they will do it if there are emergency situations. they're not entirely sure how many are left in the houses. we did speak with some who said they were going to stay regardless, they didn't feel like it was much of a threat. the high tide, though comes in at midnight tonight and they are concerned about getting another four feet of water. right now it's receding a lot since we've been here for the past few hours the entire day mostly. we can show you what it looks like here and this is certainly what it looks like. you can hear the sounds of the activity here and the generators and sirens every once in a while but wove a hard time conveying is what it smells like. there's a lot of gasoline, a lot of sewage. you don't want to imagine, rachel. what's in al
damage he has ever seen. he also said that fema will play a very strong role in the cleanup and recovery and rebuilding of this region. 83 miles long. most of it affected by this storm in a very, very big way. of course, that is part of the genesis of the meeting with the president today. the plane is now landing, i am told the president had just moments ago stopped by the fema headquarters before coming up here. and now we are told that he has landed in atlantic city. tyler, we'll be watching this meeting. we'll tell you the latest as we have it but for now, back over to you in the studio. >> kayla, thanks very much. as you just saw, air force one touching down at the atlantic city regional airport there. he's going to get aboard one of those two helicopters, along with governor chris christie of new jersey, and first do a helicopter tour of some of the devastation in the atlantic city area and up and down the jersey shorelines. then he will get out and go on foot in to some of the areas. we'll, of course, follow that story for you and bring you the images as we get them in the building
hearing a lot about fema and mitt romney's position on fema. yesterday he dodged a lot of questions about it in ohio. >> reporter: yeah, and the obama campaign and other democrats are pointing to comments romney made way back in june of 2011 at a cnn republican presidential debate. take a listen. >> fema is about to run out of money and there are some people who say do it on a case-by-case basis and some people say the state should take on a bigger role. how do you deal with that? >> every time you take something from the federal government you need to send it back to the states. that's the right direction. you can go further and send it back to the private sector, that's even better. >> reporter: john king at that debate back in 2011. yesterday mitt romney at a campaign event converted to a disaster relief event in ohio and was asked by reporters a number of times about what he would do with fema. take a listen to what he said. >> reporter: governor, would you eliminate fema if you were president? >> reporter: what would you do with fema? >> you can see he didn't say much to those questi
revenue to the federal government, you've got to go after fema, which actually fema's not driving us into debt, look at the numbers. you've got to go after big bird, big bird's not driving us into debt, go after -- >> not going after the firefighters -- >> you've got to go where the money is. you rob the banks because that's where the money is. if you want to save america, you have to go where the money is. that's health care, that's medicare, medicaid, social security. you've got to reform them in a way. and i'm not saying voucher systems, this is about math. you've got to reform them in a way that would save those systems, save this country. and then you got to go after defense spending. fema, come on. this is ridiculous. really? seriously? we want delaware governor, new jersey's governor fighting -- no. you need the federal government to step in and help coordinate. i've been in the middle of these calls. >> yeah. >> when you have killer storms coming toward the coastline. i've been in the middle of these calls, and let me tell you something, you've got to have somebody out of was
, the mayor and the sheriffs and the police, fema is not here yet, they have to still put their stuff out there, this say local people helping local people. >> so, anderson, we'll keep an eye on this, seaside heights, new jersey, and toms river, new jersey, which i know michael holmes is there. he's talking to police there and they say least 100 people or so need rescuing as well. >> brooke, chad, we'll continue to check in with you. we'll talk to the mayor of asbury parks to see what kind of damage was there. we'll talk to him and see what daylight has brought. we'll be right back. you see us, at the start of the day. on the company phone list at's a few names longer. you see us bank on busier highways. on once empty fields. everyday you see all the ways all of us at us bank are helping grow our economy. lending more so companies and communities can expand, grow stronger and get back to work. everyday you see all of us serving you, around the country, around the corner. us bank. to volunteer to help those in need. when a twinge of back pain surprises him. morning starts in high spirits,
things are stable and who is going to pay for the damage repairs. that is dealing with fema on a presidentially declared disaster like this. the insurance company is the first to pay but they can be reimbursed by the federal government depending on what kind of damage you have and what you are eligible for. >> how long does it take? >> often times it takes weeks or a month or so to work with fema to figure out what is covered and what is not. >> if your house is flooded you have to wait until the insurance conductor comes out to assess before you can start to rebuild? >> usually within 72-hours you will get the visit from the fema inspector and insurance adjust tore. you figure out who is paying for what to make sure you are covered to see who your contact will be. >> do you recommend that they rebuild their house get the water out? where do they do? what do they do? >> water is the biggest problem. the longer water stays in your house the most chance you have to have mold and those kind of problems. get any wet materials out of the house and make sure mold is not setting in
been all over. fema has been fantastic. and responsive and working these types of situations. i have total respect for the job that fema is doing. i want to thank them very much as well as the army corps of engineers. as you all know, one of the major problems still is the water in the tunnels, the water has receded, so when you drive around, it looks like most of the water is gone, but the water filled the subway tunnels in many places, fill the brooklyn battery tunnel, and when the water fills the tunnels, that means con-edison has issues. much of con-ed's equipment was in the tunnels, so getting the water out of the tunnels probably the main -- one of the main orders of business right now. first a transportation update. as you know, the new york city buses are at full service today. thank you, mr. joe and your extraordinary team. there will be limited commuter rail service on metro north and on the long island railroad which will begin 2:00 p.m. today. okay? limited commuter rail service on metro north and limited new york city subway service subpoena meanted by a business bridge
, fema resources to the state. the storm killed at least 18 people, two of whom from long island. peter king who represents parts of long island. also chairman of the homeland security committee. congressman king, i want to start with what you can tell me about the damage on long island. >> actually, this is by far the worst storm we've had at least since 1938. it's just in my district alone, long beach is basically entirely cut off, they have no sewage, they have no power, they have no water. there's going to be a mass evacuation of long beach. and there were are number of fires, seven fires i'm aware where the houses burned to the ground, fire department couldn't get to them. a man's house blew up last night. thank god his neighbor next door, the entire house blew up. the water's been contaminated in places. freeport, there's probably 90% of the people without power in the -- on long island. so this is, again, by far the worst. we have entire streets under water, 5, 6 feet of water. it's 5 feet of water everywhere. i can go community by community, what it turned out to be is that the
jersey before the storm even hit. they were able to get here quick. national guard was here, fema was here. they were all working with local authorities and able to do it smoothly. they stopped search and rescue efforts for tonight. they have gotten all of the elderly and handicap out of the area. they will do it if there are emergency situations. they are not sure how many people are left in the the houses. we spoke to some people who said they were going to stay regardless. they didn't feel like it was much of a threat. the high tide though comes in at midnight tonight and they are concerned about getting another four feet of water. it's receded a lot. we can show you what it looks like here. you can hear the sounds of the activity here and the generators and the sirens every once in awhile. we have a hard time conveying what it smells like. there's a lot of gasoline, a lot of sewage. you don't want to imagine what's in all this water right now. >> everybody needs to take that high tide seriously as we know that's one of the things leaders are saying is to think this is necessar
government is here, we're doing what we need to do, coordinating with fema and i thank you mr. fugate for being here and helping our operation even better and we will move on from here. what i said yesterday i really mean. there has got to be sorrow and you see that and the president's seen that today, in the eyes and the faces of a lot of the folks he's met and that sorrow is appropriate. we've suffered some loss. luckily we haven't suffered that much loss of life and we thank god for that but we have suffered losses and this is the worst storm that i've seen in my lifetime in this state, but we cannot permit that sorrow to replace the resilience i know all new jerseyians have so we will get up and we'll get this thing rebuilt and we'll put things back together, because that's what this state is all about and always has been all about, and so for all of you who are here and i met a bunch of you today at brigantine who d disregarded my admonition to get the hell out of here. you are forgiven this time but not for much longer. we have to make sure when all of you see all this destructi
would,. state government is here. we're doing what we need to do. we're coordinating with fema. i want to thank administrator fugate for being here and helping our operation even better and we'll move on from here. what i said yesterday i really mean. there has got to be sorrow. and you see that in, president has seen that today in the eyes and faces of a lot of folks he met. and that sorrow is appropriate. we suffered some loss. luckily we haven't suffered that much loss of life and we thank god for that. we have suffered losses. this is the worst time i've seen in my lifetime in this state but we can not permit that sorrow to reprays the -- replace resilience i know all new jerseyians have. we'll get up and get this thing built and get it back together because that is what this state is about and always been about. for all who are here, i met a bunch of you here at brigantine who disregarded my admonition to get the hell out of here. you are forgiven this time but not for much longer. when all of you look around and see all this destruction that's fine. you know what? all that stuff
and new jersey have both been declared major disaster areas, which means fema will pay 75% of local governments' costs. the other 25% are shared by state and local governments. fema also has the green light to help families in hard-hit areas pay for damage that's not covered by their insurance plans. the money comes from fema's disaster relief fund. right now, it has $3.6 billion. congress has also allotted an additional $7 billion, and officials say they're confident they can foot the bill. of course, private insurance companies will also pay out claims for damage, early estimates, put the insurance industry's tab at $10 billion. still, some policy holders who didn't separate flood insurance, could be in for a big surprise. >> those policies are available through the national flood insurance program. however, if you didn't have one, you may have a situation where you're not going to have coverage for your loss if all you had was flood damage. >> reporter: insurance companies say adjusters are ready to start assessing damage and paying claims. but the scope of the damage could slow
of the jersey shore saying 2,000 fema personnel are on the gloupd rou affected states. at least 74 people have died in the u.s. as a result of sandy. most of them from new york and new jersey. still 5.6 million customers in the dark. and it may be ten days before the hardest hit areas sea power restored. more than 19,000 flights were canceled because of sandy, but stranded passengers have something to be thankful for. newark and jfk airports were back in business yesterday and delta and american airlines are scheduled to resume a limited number of flights out of laguardia in about 30 minutes. the mta is also getting back to business with new york city subways offering limited service starting today. the m tcta is waiving all fees until tomorrow. so good news there. >> we're looking for any good news so thank you. the eye of hurricane sandy has hit the jersey shore hard. it wiped away entire economies. president obama surveyed the damage with chris christie yesterday. this morning kayla tausche is in toms river, seaside heights. what's it look like there? >> reporter: it's very dark here. we're
of snow, so already starting to fall, and fema, federal emergency management agency, says the storm damage from wind alone could reach $3 billion. we're also going to be hearing from the president about 45 minutes or so from the white house. he is going to be making a statement, updating the conditions of what the federal government is doing to tackle this horrific storm. forecasters expect that sandy will make landfall as early as tonight. the eye of the storm appears headed for jersey shore. the delmarva peninsula. it's an area that includes delaware, parts of maryland and urban search and rescue teams already standing by in maryland, waiting for deployment orders from fema. coastal maryland getting ready, already pounded by a strong waves, high surf. martin o'malley is following developments from the emergency management center. governor, first of all, thanks for joining us. i know this is a very busy time for you. i was just in maryland over the weekend visiting with family and friends, and clearly a lot of people right now quite tense about what is about to take place. you have search
will be somewhere between $10 billion and $20 billion when it is all tallied up. craig fugate is director of fema. we spoke with him yesterday about what they were expecting. mr. fugate, we appreciate your time this morning. walk me through the areas that have now been affected and where fema's resources are. >> well, we're working the pretty much everything from the carolinas all the way up. the way the storm's going we still have impact. last night after conversations with both governors of new jersey and new york, president obama took the extraordinary action to issue a major disaster declaration based upon the impact that had occurred. what that means is now not only are we providing direct response, but also financial support to state and local governments for response. individuals in these immediate declared areas can start registering for assistance by calling 1-800-621-fema or going to disasterassistance.gov and start the registration process. we know there are people in counties that have not yet been declared. we will be adding on additional counties throughout the day, and probably ove
's the message he keeps conveying. and i should say also praising his fema director who has also gotten some praise from governor christie as well, wolf. >> governor christie has been very fusive in his phrase. as they head toward the microphones let's take a quick, quick break. on the other side we'll hear from the president. [ woman ] it's 32 minutes to go time, and the candidate's speech is in pieces all over the district. the writer's desktop and the coordinator's phone are working on a joke with local color. the secure cloud just received a revised intro from the strategist's tablet. and while i make my way into the venue, the candidate will be rehearsing off of his phone. [ candidate ] and thanks to every young face i see out there. [ woman ] his phone is one of his biggest supporters. [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center... working together has never worked so well. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 you know, the one that's been lying around. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rollover your old 401(k) to a schwab ira, and we'll help you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 find new ways to make yo
. >> it was a bull's-eye of the storm. fema's not here. they're in new jersey, breezy point. they're everywhere, not an staten island. every single person on this block lost everything. do you know how many people died on this block? they're pulling goods out. >> reporter: it's hard to imagine anyone could neglect staten islanders when their stories are so harrowing. the sea water rose so fast, it was upon them in minutes. there was an off-duty police officer who rushed his family to safety in his attic and then is thought to have been electrocuted. and there was little diane could do but stand inside her living room holding her 89-year-old mother as the water rose. her mother drowned. and this afternoon, in a stoate island marsh, the discovery of the bodies of two boys dragged from their mother's arms from floodwaters. some residents fear they haven't seen the end of it. >> they're still looking for dead bodies. people held unaccounted for. this death toll is going up. but you need to come here and see it. we need help, please. >> reporter: the frustration was directed at the red cross -- >> t
process with fema, and get whatever assistance he needed. he moved the expedited process this morning by declaring new jersey a major disaster area. the eight counties receiving an immediate declaration for individual and public assistance include atlantic, cape may, hudson, essex, middlesex, marmouth and union. this is not final and other counties will be added as we make the damage assessment. the biggest issues we're facing right now in the most impacted counties are search and rescue and restoration of power. i want to make sure we're getting to new jersey for those who chose to not leave evacuated areaers on got caught in floodwaters. our priority is to help every new jerseyian. engaging in coastline rescue efforts. our swift water team is positioned in atlantic city and has begun rescue and recovery for those who remained in atlantic city. the team's ununits from central and south to union beach, middletown, belmar are beginning search and rescue operations. we saw significant tidal flooding in several areas. everywhere from jersey city to newark bay area, sayreville, moon be on
airlines to talk about the impact on the industry and the man who led fema during hurricane katrina will tell us what the federal emergency agency should expect from this storm. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use, it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. you have to dig a little. fidelity's etf market tracker shows you the big picture on how different asset classes are performing, and it lets you go in for a closer look at areas within a class or sector that may be bucking a larger trend. i'm stephen hett of fidelity investments. the etf market tracker is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. get 200 free trades today and explore your next investing idea. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. >> we talked
that has been damaged so badly by the flooding and by the wind. it goes beyond a fema grant and it comes at a time when we are dealing with a clip and a fragile economy. >> one way or the other it has to be paid for. it requires a supplemental appropriation. first of all, there is enough money director fugate says for the fema part of the recovery, i think we voted $6.1 billion in the budget. there is enough in the fund right now. director fugate says. as far as the improvements that will have to be the supplemental appropriation and we'll have to have that be accounted for. but one way or the other, we'll have to have that be done. it is enormous not to improvement. it could have long-term economic consequences. we'll have to see what it is going to be. we'll have a commitment to make sure it is going to be done. >> thank you so much for joining us. >> millions are without power tonight. coming up. we'll ask the guy who runs the east coast utility companies when and how he plans to get that back on the grid. >> sandy, the path of destruction. there are a lot of warning lights and sounds
as a major disaster area. i was on the phone with fema at 2:00 a.m. this morning to answer the questions they needed answers to get that designation, and the president has been outstanding in this, and so the folks of fema, craig fugate and his folks have been excellent >> i know you took exception with the handling of this situation by the mayor of atlantic city, lorenzo langford. you were very upset that he didn't evacuate that city or all of that city and instead offered some people shelter in some city shelters, and you said that he was a rogue mayor and said, quote, i don't have a feud with the guy, but i wish he would do his job. a little time has passed between those comments and right now, the emotional level has come down. do you still feel that way? >> listen, the fact of the matter is i feel badly for the folks in atlantic city who listened to him and sheltered in atlantic city, and i guess my -- my anger has turned to sympathy for those folks, and we're in the midst now of trying to go in and save them. daylight has come. we've got an urban search and rescue team with,000 bot
, things of that nature are all freed up. just got this from the white house, fema is going door-to-door, people might need assistance at the coast guard and taking the lead to identify hazardous floodwaters. not exactly the cleanest water on earth. how do you dispose of that and also fema will support any request from state officials who need help with polling places next week, only a few days from the federal election. the irs is granting taxpayers affected by the hurricane until november 7th if they were supposed to file returns or payments for today. the fdic telling financial institutions if they are having problems with their reporting timeline they can contact them as well. campaign continues tomorrow. mitt romney will be in virginia. president obama back on the campaign trail. green bay, wisconsin, boulder, colorado, las vegas. melissa: thanks for that report. ashley: let's get back to check the markets. the dow up by 35 points and have been in this range for a while. nicole petallides on the nyse. big movers in the wake of sandy. nicole: we will follow sandy at aftermath
in washington, d.c., we got some statistics from fema earlier today. they say they have plenty of money on hand. they have got $3.6 billion left in their contingency fund as of october 26th. they have spent some of that now, prepositioning generators in some of the hardest-hit areas so they got the material in advance but they say they have plenty of money left in the fund. now, president obama earlier today met with some of his top disaster officials, including the admin straighter of fema, mr. few gate, at the white house in the situation room, getting the latest there. federal officials telling us that they have the money they need now and they will be able to send that out to the states now that these disaster declarations have been made. here in washington, locally, the worst passed us by, a flooded potomac river it is still in its banks. that means the worst is over here. back to you guys. >> thank you vet. super storm sandy slamming the east coast. we will talk about the impact on the gross domestic product and the retailer. >>> this video just came in of atlantic city new jersey. sectio
continues to lie to the american people. he was totally against fema, now he's for fema. i also feel that he is very rich. and we have the new york the biggest financial capital of the whole country, of the whole world. new jersey is devastated, parts of virginia, parts of ohio and wisconsin. he's a very very very extremely rism man who pays very very very low taxes and i think he personally should be contributing several million dollars of his own money to help the people of the united states that he claims that he's trying to help. and i think the jeep chrysler ads were just outrageous. i'm disappointed. i'm a senior. i'm 70. i'm on social security. we have worked. we have a lovely little home in cape cod. we did live in new jersey. we're fortunate enough to be able to retire. but i'm really disappointed in a lot of the seniors of this country who are so afraid that they are going to misbenefits and not be taken care of. and personally i feel a lot of seniors are extremely, extremely selfish and fearful. host: let's take a call from the romney supporters line in michigan. caller: just call
related to hurricane sandy. we'll get a unique perspective from former fema director david paulson. looking for a better place to put your cash? here's one you may not have thought of -- fidelity. now you don't have to go to a bank to get the things you want from a bank, like no-fee atms, all over the world. free checkwriting and mobile deposits. now depositing a check is as easy as taking a picture. free online bill payments. a highly acclaimed credit card with 2% cash back into your fidelity account. open a fidelity cash management account today and discover another reason serious investors are choosing fidel i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it could save y
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)